Imarc

Commonly asked questions during the creative process

Rachel Lemieux, Art Director
Posted on Aug 11, 2021

In the two decades that Imarc has been designing websites, these ten questions come up the most often. Here’s how we answer them.

Throughout any creative process, there will be a multitude of questions that arise from the client. We’ve taken the top ten questions that we get asked the most during web design projects and answered them here.

  1. How can we stand out in our crowded marketplace?

  2. Can we look more like [market leader]?

  3. Will I get multiple options to choose from?

  4. Will every page have a design comp?

  5. What’s this going to look like on mobile?

  6. Can you source imagery for us?

  7. Can you create custom icons for us?

  8. When can I see it?

  9. What are your thoughts on changing XYZ in the design? Can we see what XYZ looks like?

  10. Who should I involve in the web project? When should I get the C-level or internal teams involved?

How can we stand out in our crowded marketplace?

Standing out from the crowd can be difficult in a saturated market. However, a solid brand that has a well-grounded message, identity, and purpose will stand out as genuine. Creating a website and a brand that is easy, accessible, consistent, and trustworthy will help a company reach the top.

Can we look more like [market leader]?

Oscar Wilde said, “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.” It’s true, there are plenty of copycats out there. While you may want to replicate the ideas of a competitor that is doing well, you should not copy the look of the design. If you want to be unique in the marketplace, you need to have your own brand identity.

Will I get multiple options to choose from?

The answer to this depends on the project and how much time is allotted for design.

At Imarc, our process is very thorough, so we only show one design option for web projects. By utilizing techniques in our creative kickoff such as benchmarking sites, discussing brand archetypes, and examining current brand guidelines, we have found that one homepage design is sufficient.

If a client does express the desire to see multiple options, we usually take a step back in the process and create mood boards. Mood boards help us understand client likes and dislikes at a high level. The designer can then bring those components into the website design compositions.

Will every page have a design comp?

Short answer, no. Designers will create styles that can easily be translated by the front-end developer to successfully build additional pages. A designer will tackle the unique pages, i.e. homepage, about us, product pages, news pages, resources, blog, etc. because they typically have different layouts than a standard interior page. Other than that, one interior page design should be sufficient for development to create the remaining pages.

What’s this going to look like on mobile?

Depending on the project scope, mobile designs may or may not be included in the design process. Even if a mobile design is not requested, rest assured, the designer typically makes a homepage mobile composition for the front-end developer to follow. Clients may also get an idea of the mobile layout in the wireframing stage as some strategists will mock-up mobile wires in their process.

Can you source imagery for us?

We are more than happy to source imagery for you. We highly recommend creating an image library for your brand. This will help build out your branding components and to allow your brand to have a solid library of assets to choose from in the future. Sourced imagery should reinforce the brand’s look and feel and establish the basis of a brand’s identity.

Can you create custom icons for us?

Yes, of course! Icons can really help a brand’s identity come to life. They can help create a unique experience on a website and set the brand apart from competitors.

When can I see it?

Out of all the questions in this list, this is by far the most common. Having a solid, structured timeline will limit the number of times this is asked throughout a project. The answer entirely depends on the agreed-upon timeline. 

What are your thoughts on changing XYZ in the design? Can we see what XYZ looks like?

I have always been open to hearing clients’ opinions on changes and edits to a design. Constructive feedback is definitely preferred as it will help the designer understand why something needs to change and it will help them realize a better solution.

Some people are the “I’ll know it when I see it” type, so as a designer, I’m comfortable showing a couple of variations upon the client’s request. However, it’s important for the client and the designer to understand why they want to see a specific design. In my experience, backing up design decisions with knowledge and good reasoning will really help the client-designer relationship. It’s best for a project manager to be involved to prevent an endless cycle of changes, help set client expectations, and keep everyone on track to meet deadlines.

Who should I involve in the web project? When should I get the C-level or internal teams involved?

We all know the saying, “too many cooks in the kitchen.” Having too many people involved in the project can complicate feedback and extend the feedback process longer than necessary. On the other hand, key people – whether it’s the C-level or marketing team – should be involved from the start. Getting these stakeholders involved at the beginning will encourage any concerns to be addressed earlier in the process. Make sure everyone knows the goals and priorities ahead of time so that feedback and opinions are relevant and push the project forward.

We’re ready to design your new website

Ready to refresh your website? Our designers are ready to help. We love to push the limits of creativity and user experience to help you stand out in your industry. Want to learn more about the Imarc process? Let’s talk!

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